New JOHN CARMACK Interview on Xbox360 - PC - PS3

Discussion in 'Playstation' started by Air Raid, Jan 9, 2006.

  1. Air Raid Guest

    http://www.buzzscope.com/features.php?id=1248

    John Carmack Interview
    by Howard Brown 2006-01-04

    John Carmack is one of the videogaming industry's elite icons. Credited
    with originating the first person genre of games, gaming would not be
    where it is today without this programmer. Not only does each game he
    releases redefine the genre in some way, but the technology behind it
    shapes the evolution of videogame graphics and sound in each
    generation. Even if you don't play his games, you'll be hard pressed to
    not feel the influence of them as the ideas and elements introduced in
    each one of his engines are used and adapted in some way industry-wide.
    As such, few can say they've affected the gaming scene as much as he
    has and the company he keeps in that respect is small. We recently had
    a chance to ask Mr. Carmack a few questions on a number of topics. If
    you want to know why he prefers the Xbox 360 to the PS3, what id's next
    projects are, what he thinks of the next generation of mobile graphics
    and more then read on as one of the greatest minds in videogames
    speaks.

    Howard Brown: DOOM RPG is now out and it's a fantastic game, especially
    in consideration of the massive restraints of a cell phone handset.
    What was your original vision for DOOM RPG and what did you want to
    include in the game but were unable to due to handset restraints? Are
    you pleased with your efforts on DOOM RPG?


    John Carmack: The BREW version pretty much did everything I wanted, and
    I was very happy with the results. The most frustrating thing with the
    J2ME version was the sound output. Even though we really didn't have
    the memory budget to do a lot with it, the API implementation
    absolutely crippled our efforts.


    I did realize on the BREW port that I couldn't afford to devote
    enough of my personal hours to the project to truly maximize the
    rendering engine. Modern BREW phones are quite powerful little machines
    with a lot of potential. If I was able to work on it full time for a
    few months I would make different implementation decisions, but since I
    was only able to devote a few weekends to my programming on the
    project, I wound up going with a simple and robust strategy instead of
    something technically challenging.


    HB: Many people have developed a major interest in DOOM RPG, especially
    with that amazing trailer that you and Jamdat released. I have even
    heard people wishing for the game to come out on the PC?! Have there
    been any thoughts on seeing the next installment of DOOM RPG being
    released on formats other than mobile, or any consideration with
    working on the 3D accelerated handsets? What do you think of those 3D
    accelerated handsets?


    JC: We looked into the possibility of porting and expanding our
    upcoming mobile game to the GameBoy Advanced, but the market for third
    party titles without a major toy tie in didn't look good at all. I
    could imagine moving some titles to the iPod, but we don't have any
    firm plans.


    The first generation mobile 3D parts from ATI and nVidia were both
    botched a bit, but in different ways. I expect the second generation
    parts to be clean and effective. We are negotiating with ATI about
    possibly making a dedicated 3D accelerated version of an upcoming
    mobile game, which would really let me do some cool work on it.


    HB: First person games are your bread & butter, but have you thought of
    creating a game that is a different genre? Do you see mobile gaming as
    your testing ground for new titles?


    JC: I have a backlog of a half dozen different game ideas for mobile at
    the moment, and most of them aren't first person.


    HB: What are your thoughts on the Xbox 360 and the PS3? With the Xbox
    360 now released in three territories, can you see yourself developing
    a game with either of those consoles in mind? "DOOM 3: Demonic
    Regions" for Xbox 360 & PS3, maybe?


    JC: They are both powerful systems that are going to make excellent
    game platforms, but I have a bit of a preference for the 360's
    symmetric CPU architecture and excellent development tools. The PS3
    will have a bit more peak power, but it will be easier to exploit the
    available power on the 360. Our next major title is being focused
    towards simultaneous release on 360, PS3, and PC.


    HB: DOOM the movie...What do you think? If you had the opportunity
    would you have rather been the director of that movie or had more
    control with the production?


    JC: I liked it. I had intentionally kept myself completely away from
    the movie production, because I wanted to see the completed work for a
    valid first impression, and I don't have any notion that I am
    qualified to be a movie director. I liked the first Mortal Kombat movie
    and the Resident Evil movies, and I put the Doom movie in with them
    instead of the miserable game movies like Mario Brothers and Double
    Dragon.


    HB: DOOM 3 is out and almost dusted. What is the next biggest game that
    you're working on right now for mobile and PC?


    JC: We aren't talking about our next PC/console game yet, but our
    next mobile game is a fantasy themed game with a similar core play
    style to Doom RPG. I am excited to get this in the hands of reviewers,
    because it is such a good example of what I have been talking about
    with regards to the rapid pace of evolution possible on the mobile
    titles - the game is just much better in every possible way. The team
    at Fountainhead has taken all the positive things we discovered about
    this style of play with Doom RPG, and added a large number of unique
    innovations.

    HB: Thanks for your time John and we look forward to learning more of
    your future projects soon.
  2. Highlandish Guest

    Quoth The Raven; Air Raid <AirRaidJet@gmail.com> in
    <1136424133.922629.201130@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>
    > http://www.buzzscope.com/features.php?id=1248
    >
    > John Carmack Interview
    > by Howard Brown 2006-01-04
    >
    > John Carmack is one of the videogaming industry's elite icons.
    > Credited with originating the first person genre of games, gaming
    > would not be where it is today without this programmer. Not only does
    > each game he releases redefine the genre in some way, but the
    > technology behind it shapes the evolution of videogame graphics and
    > sound in each generation. Even if you don't play his games, you'll be
    > hard pressed to not feel the influence of them as the ideas and
    > elements introduced in each one of his engines are used and adapted
    > in some way industry-wide. As such, few can say they've affected the
    > gaming scene as much as he has and the company he keeps in that
    > respect is small. We recently had a chance to ask Mr. Carmack a few
    > questions on a number of topics. If you want to know why he prefers
    > the Xbox 360 to the PS3, what id's next projects are, what he thinks
    > of the next generation of mobile graphics and more then read on as
    > one of the greatest minds in videogames speaks.
    >
    > Howard Brown: DOOM RPG is now out and it's a fantastic game,
    > especially in consideration of the massive restraints of a cell phone
    > handset. What was your original vision for DOOM RPG and what did you
    > want to include in the game but were unable to due to handset
    > restraints? Are you pleased with your efforts on DOOM RPG?
    >
    >
    > John Carmack: The BREW version pretty much did everything I wanted,
    > and I was very happy with the results. The most frustrating thing
    > with the J2ME version was the sound output. Even though we really
    > didn't have the memory budget to do a lot with it, the API
    > implementation absolutely crippled our efforts.
    >
    >
    > I did realize on the BREW port that I couldn't afford to devote
    > enough of my personal hours to the project to truly maximize the
    > rendering engine. Modern BREW phones are quite powerful little
    > machines with a lot of potential. If I was able to work on it full
    > time for a few months I would make different implementation
    > decisions, but since I was only able to devote a few weekends to my
    > programming on the project, I wound up going with a simple and robust
    > strategy instead of something technically challenging.
    >
    >
    > HB: Many people have developed a major interest in DOOM RPG,
    > especially with that amazing trailer that you and Jamdat released. I
    > have even heard people wishing for the game to come out on the PC?!
    > Have there been any thoughts on seeing the next installment of DOOM
    > RPG being released on formats other than mobile, or any consideration
    > with working on the 3D accelerated handsets? What do you think of
    > those 3D accelerated handsets?
    >
    >
    > JC: We looked into the possibility of porting and expanding our
    > upcoming mobile game to the GameBoy Advanced, but the market for third
    > party titles without a major toy tie in didn't look good at all. I
    > could imagine moving some titles to the iPod, but we don't have any
    > firm plans.
    >
    >
    > The first generation mobile 3D parts from ATI and nVidia were both
    > botched a bit, but in different ways. I expect the second generation
    > parts to be clean and effective. We are negotiating with ATI about
    > possibly making a dedicated 3D accelerated version of an upcoming
    > mobile game, which would really let me do some cool work on it.
    >
    >
    > HB: First person games are your bread & butter, but have you thought
    > of creating a game that is a different genre? Do you see mobile
    > gaming as your testing ground for new titles?
    >
    >
    > JC: I have a backlog of a half dozen different game ideas for mobile
    > at the moment, and most of them aren't first person.
    >
    >
    > HB: What are your thoughts on the Xbox 360 and the PS3? With the Xbox
    > 360 now released in three territories, can you see yourself developing
    > a game with either of those consoles in mind? "DOOM 3: Demonic
    > Regions" for Xbox 360 & PS3, maybe?
    >
    >
    > JC: They are both powerful systems that are going to make excellent
    > game platforms, but I have a bit of a preference for the 360's
    > symmetric CPU architecture and excellent development tools. The PS3
    > will have a bit more peak power, but it will be easier to exploit the
    > available power on the 360. Our next major title is being focused
    > towards simultaneous release on 360, PS3, and PC.
    >
    >
    > HB: DOOM the movie...What do you think? If you had the opportunity
    > would you have rather been the director of that movie or had more
    > control with the production?
    >
    >
    > JC: I liked it. I had intentionally kept myself completely away from
    > the movie production, because I wanted to see the completed work for a
    > valid first impression, and I don't have any notion that I am
    > qualified to be a movie director. I liked the first Mortal Kombat
    > movie and the Resident Evil movies, and I put the Doom movie in with
    > them instead of the miserable game movies like Mario Brothers and
    > Double Dragon.
    >
    >
    > HB: DOOM 3 is out and almost dusted. What is the next biggest game
    > that you're working on right now for mobile and PC?
    >
    >
    > JC: We aren't talking about our next PC/console game yet, but our
    > next mobile game is a fantasy themed game with a similar core play
    > style to Doom RPG. I am excited to get this in the hands of reviewers,
    > because it is such a good example of what I have been talking about
    > with regards to the rapid pace of evolution possible on the mobile
    > titles - the game is just much better in every possible way. The team
    > at Fountainhead has taken all the positive things we discovered about
    > this style of play with Doom RPG, and added a large number of unique
    > innovations.
    >
    > HB: Thanks for your time John and we look forward to learning more of
    > your future projects soon.


    what a shit game, no multiplayer :)

    --
    Remove the _CURSEING to reply to me

    We do not remember days, we remember moments. - Cesare Pavese
  3. redTed Guest

    >SNIP<
    John who ?
  4. John Lewis Guest

    On Thu, 5 Jan 2006 17:35:34 +0100, "redTed" <redted@NTL3mbfinally.com>
    wrote:

    >>SNIP<

    >John who ?
    >
    >


    Yes, really............ It is now a very long time since Id produced
    any 'ground-breaking' game software. John is now more focussed
    on generating easy money for his space-projects and other vehicular
    endeavors than furthering gaming-software innovations.

    John Lewis
  5. Fred Liken Guest

    "John Lewis" <john.dsl@verizon.net> wrote

    >>John who ?

    >
    > Yes, really............ It is now a very long time since Id produced
    > any 'ground-breaking' game software.


    ID's engines are used quite often... Carmack's Reverse, also...

    > John is now more focussed
    > on generating easy money for his space-projects and other vehicular
    > endeavors than furthering gaming-software innovations.


    So ignorant...
  6. Sean Cousins Guest

    On 5 Jan 2006 14:50:16 -0600, "Fred Liken"
    <nothanks@toocoolforschool.com> wrote:


    >ID's engines are used quite often...


    Exactly. He may know how to create a good graphics engine but ID's
    games are not so great.
  7. Highlandish Guest

    Quoth The Raven; redTed <redted@NTL3mbfinally.com> in
    <43bd4ad8$0$29219$8fcfb975@news.wanadoo.fr>
    >>SNIP<

    > John who ?


    HEATHEN, INFIDEL, he is your god!

    --
    Remove the _CURSEING to reply to me

    Q. Why did Moses wander in the desert for 40 years? A. Even then men
    wouldn't ask for directions.
  8. Khee Mao Guest

    "Sean Cousins" <spam@off.invalid> wrote in message
    news:4hbrr1hjpmg2pjf60347qfte7ge6sma3p3@4ax.com...
    > On 5 Jan 2006 14:50:16 -0600, "Fred Liken"
    > <nothanks@toocoolforschool.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>ID's engines are used quite often...

    >
    > Exactly. He may know how to create a good graphics engine but ID's
    > games are not so great.
    >
    >

    meh???

    Quake II/Arena/IV?!?!?!?

    Doom 3?

    Wolfenstein?!?!?!?


    sure, they're no Barbie Horse Adventures, but I'd say Id pretty much sets
    the standard for FPS.
  9. Jonah Falcon Guest

    I wonder if Carmack really liked DOOM the movie or if he's trying not to PO
    the studio. lol
  10. Fred Liken Guest

    "Sean Cousins" <spam@off.invalid> wrote in message
    news:4hbrr1hjpmg2pjf60347qfte7ge6sma3p3@4ax.com...

    >>ID's engines are used quite often...

    >
    > Exactly. He may know how to create a good graphics engine but ID's
    > games are not so great.


    Not sure what your point is. When he talks about hardware, that's the realm
    of engines, not games.
  11. Fred Liken Guest

    "Andrew" <spamtrap@localhost.> wrote in message
    news:4v7sr19r5s7ik3ulqh75l4hqes1tvga1nl@4ax.com...

    > Doom did hands down. DN3D, Unreal, Half Life 1&2 and many others are
    > all games that went far beyond anything you get in iD games which
    > since Quake have only ever been technology demos.


    Nonesense. Return to Wolf.
  12. Sean Cousins Guest

    On 6 Jan 2006 11:08:02 -0600, "Fred Liken"
    <nothanks@toocoolforschool.com> wrote:


    >Nonesense. Return to Wolf.
    >


    ID didn't do RTW, Gray Matter Studios did.
    http://www.gmistudios.com/Games.htm
  13. Sean Cousins Guest

    On 6 Jan 2006 11:07:05 -0600, "Fred Liken"
    <nothanks@toocoolforschool.com> wrote:


    >Not sure what your point is. When he talks about hardware, that's the realm
    >of engines, not games.
    >


    "Not only does each game he
    releases redefine the genre in some way,"

    The above comment is BS. There was nothing redefining about D3, and Q4
    was done by Raven, which is also rather stale, IMO.
  14. Fred Liken Guest

    "Sean Cousins" <spam@off.invalid> wrote in message
    news:p4etr1dsd1q7o5tpmca3qdcfrue69uns0e@4ax.com...
    > On 6 Jan 2006 11:08:02 -0600, "Fred Liken"
    > <nothanks@toocoolforschool.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Nonesense. Return to Wolf.

    >
    > ID didn't do RTW, Gray Matter Studios did.


    id was executive producer.

    > http://www.gmistudios.com/Games.htm
  15. Dub Guest

    Fred Liken wrote:
    > id was executive producer.


    Right you are. And RTCW used a modified Quake III engine -- as did
    many, many other important games of that era. Whatever other people
    may say about iD's games (and I happened to love Doom 3), it's
    impossible to deny their ongoing contribution to the gaming world.
  16. Sean Cousins Guest

    On 6 Jan 2006 16:59:01 -0600, "Fred Liken"
    <nothanks@toocoolforschool.com> wrote:


    >id was executive producer.


    I know that but they didn't really have much to do with the game.
    There name is on it because it is their franchise. I didn't think much
    of RTW anyway.
  17. Fred Liken Guest

    "Sean Cousins" <spam@off.invalid> wrote in message
    news:1psur19qoevveetp9hum6sveak63al90b2@4ax.com...
    > On 6 Jan 2006 16:59:01 -0600, "Fred Liken"
    > <nothanks@toocoolforschool.com> wrote:
    >
    >>id was executive producer.

    >
    > I know that but they didn't really have much to do with the game.


    Source?

    > There name is on it because it is their franchise.


    Well, yeah...

    > I didn't think much of RTW anyway.


    Who cares?
  18. Fred Liken Guest

    "Dub" <dub273@gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:1136588882.235124.121260@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    > Fred Liken wrote:


    >> id was executive producer.

    >
    > Right you are. And RTCW used a modified Quake III engine -- as did
    > many, many other important games of that era.


    What I've read is that Carmack got pulled in to help with RTCW quite a bit.

    > Whatever other people
    > may say about iD's games (and I happened to love Doom 3), it's
    > impossible to deny their ongoing contribution to the gaming world.


    Meh, it's just people who don't know what's going on trying to run their
    mouths then attempt to save face once they figure out what they've done.
  19. Sean Cousins Guest

    On 9 Jan 2006 10:32:02 -0600, "Fred Liken"
    <nothanks@toocoolforschool.com> wrote:


    >Who cares?
    >

    Then don't respond, dumbass.
  20. Fred Liken Guest

    "Sean Cousins" <spam@off.invalid> wrote

    >>Who cares?
    >>

    > Then don't respond, dumbass.


    I'll respond to posts that you make that are non-sequitor dodges all I
    please, my friend.

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